Publisher's Summary

A viral strain has attacked rice crops in East Asia, causing massive famine; soon a mutation appears that infects the staple crops of West Asia and Europe, such as wheat and barley, threatening a famine engulfing the whole of the Old World, while Australasia and the Americas attempt to impose rigorous quarantine to exclude the virus.
Christopher's classic post-apocalyptic novel follows the struggles of architect John Custance and his family as they make their way across an England that is rapidly descending into anarchy, hoping to reach the safety of John's brother's farm in an isolated Westmorland valley. Along the way, they find they must sacrifice many of their morals in order to stay alive.
Here is an unusual and absorbing piece of science-fiction about the relentless transformation of civilisation when the balance of nature is upset.
©1956 Samuel Youd (P)2011 Audible Ltd
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Critic Reviews

"I admire The Death of Grass. It was published at roughly the same time as The Day Of The Triffids. In my judgement, it is by far the better book. It is a thrilling and sensible work." (Brian Aldiss)
"Gripping! Of all science fiction's apocalypses, this is one of the most haunting." ( Financial Times)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Linda B on 28-03-2011

Excellent, frightening story

This story is terrifying, and it is sad that one can imagine this would be a likely scenario given such events. It is well paced and moves along nicely. If you like end of the world science fiction, you will probably like this.

One warning however, there is an introduction in which someone tries to place the novel in its literary istorical context and comment on various aspects of it. Though interesting, the reviewer gives away major portions of the plot and dialogue and it really hurts the story. I advise you skip that as it contains significant story spoilers, and listen to it afterward, if you are curious.

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3 of 5 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Richard Ferrie on 30-06-2018

Surprising Rediscovery

This book has haunted me since I read it as a young teen many decades ago. It came into my hands as an item from the Science Fiction Book Club subscription series. Sheltered, innocent for my age, I knew that I didn't understand certain aspects of the book. Perhaps some of my appreciation now comes from filling in those blanks. But I expected something else, something raggeder, less concise and unflinching. I recognize here the obvious origins of McCarthy"s THE ROAD as well as several recent post-apocalypse films. This is anything but a young adult book. It is a small masterpiece.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Charles on 18-08-2011

The end of the world as seen from the 1950's

I fondly remembered reading John Christopher's Tripod Trilogy as a child so when I came across this I leapt at the chance to listen to one of his books for adults. I was not disappointed.

The publisher's summary offers a useful guide to the plot and the comparisons with Day of the Triffids are obvious. What was more striking (as the book progressed) were the echoes of Lord of the Flies (published two years earlier); the difference being that Golding chose to examine the impact upon children of their removal from civilization whereas Christopher describes the possible impact upon adults of a breakdown in civil society.

The result is fascinating and sometimes illuminating even if it ultimately remains a book of its time and William Gaminara does an inspired job of animating the relatively large cast of characters.

If you do choose to download then one last piece of advice. The recording includes an introduction by Robert Macfarlane. This is interesting but includes a number of significant spoilers. I therefore rather think that it would have been better included as an afterword. The novel proper begins with a "prodrome" at 19mins 40 secs and I would therefore recommend that you speed forward to that and listen to the introduction at the end.

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32 of 32 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Laura on 05-01-2015

One of my favourite books of all time

This is an incredible book and it is really well read. I would really recommend reading or listening to this one- probably one of my all time favourites.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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