Publisher's Summary

After the fall of the American Ayatollahs as foretold in Stranger in a Strange Land and chronicled in Revolt in 2100, the United States of America at last fulfills the promise inherent in its first Revolution: for the first time in human history there is a nation with Liberty and Justice for All. No one may seize or harm the person or property of another, or invade his privacy, or force him to do his bidding. Americans are fiercely proud of their re-won liberties and the blood it cost them; nothing could make them forswear those truths they hold self-evident. Nothing except the promise of immortality…
©1958 Robert A. Heinlein (P)2012 Brilliance Audio, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Diane on 17-09-2012

Enjoyed this one

I had read another of Heinlein's books about the same characters (Time Enough for Love) where he was writing about Lazerus Long as he looked back on a v-e-r-y long life. So when I found this one I had to have it. It was a delight as I listened to the beginning of the history of the Howard Family and their fight to survive against their short-lived kin and incidentally became the first people to voyage to the stars. There was some overlap in the two storylines but the details were more fleshed out in Children.
If I had this book in paperback it would probably be in a definitely worn condition because I would want to read it again and again.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Anne on 16-02-2013

A delight to revisit a science fiction classic

I first read Methuselah's Children as a young woman and, although I was already hooked on Robert Heinlein, I fell in love with the characters of the Howard Families. I especially loved the amazing and swashbuckling free spirit, Lazarus Long (Woodrow Wilson Smith.) The story is sheer fun, although the message about the value of life and the importance of knowing it will end and facing that without fear, along with other thought-provoking themes elevated it above just "fluff."

The original story was serialized in a Science Fiction magazine in 1941 (very common in those days.) It was expanded into a novel and published in 1958. It is part of what Heinlein called his "Future History" series. For me, having been alive - albeit very young - in 1958, the anachronisms seem both shocking and hilarious. As wise and "forward thinking" as Heinlein was for his time, there was much he didn't foresee. Two aspects most stand out as products of the time. The first is the ubiquitous smoking everyone was doing, which was hilarious. The second was the role of women, which was less hilarious. Admittedly, they weren't pictured quite as fully second-class citizens as they really were in the first half of the 20th century, but the firm hold of power that the men hold in this story is a stark reminder of what life was like then.

Nevertheless, if you bring your imagination and remember when this was written, you'll enjoy it.

Now I shall begin "Time Enough for Love," the sequel to "Methuselah's Children," and my absolute favorite Heinlein novel (well... along with "Stranger in a Strange Land," my other absolute favorite Heinlein.)

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5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Kev Partner on 25-06-2014

My first Heinlein - I'm hooked!

As a big Arthur C Clarke and, in particular, Asimov, fan, encountering my first Heinlein novel is like discovering a whole new motherlode of my favourite type of science-fiction. Although a little dated in places (people smoke, for example), I was astonished, on finishing the book, to see that it was first published in 1941 so, when the moon landings are mentioned they are in the characters' past but the writer's future.

The plot itself is a little pedestrian - a series of events rather than the build up of tension more typical of modern writing. Perhaps this was because it was originally serialised. Having said that, it raised lots of interesting issues and was full of ideas. It's also not afraid to include "real" science and maths that the reader/listener is unlikely to understand. I like that.

The narration was fine - not a great range of voices though. And the Australian accent in the first part of the book is absolutely hilarious.

Overall, a great introduction to Heinlein - I'm just gutted that the next book in the "Lazarus Long" sequence ("Time Enough for Love") isn't on Audible. I guess I'll have to actually read it then,,,

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Dune Drifter on 16-10-2015

keeps you guessing

Loved it. I found it difficult to put down. The same great stories I've come to know and love from Robert Heinlein. Macleod Andrews always does a fantastic job with his superb narration skills. I'll be looking for more titles he has narrated. Space travel, fountain of youth, faster than the speed of light, we aren't the brightest creatures in the universe. Saying anymore would spoil it. I'd rate it a 10 out of 10.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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