Publisher's Summary

Did Hitler - code name "Grey Wolf" - really die in 1945? Gripping new evidence shows what could have happened.
When Truman asked Stalin in 1945 whether Hitler was dead, Stalin replied bluntly, "No." As late as 1952, Eisenhower declared: "We have been unable to unearth one bit of tangible evidence of Hitler's death." What really happened? Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams have compiled extensive evidence - some recently declassified - that Hitler actually fled Berlin and took refuge in a remote Nazi enclave in Argentina. The recent discovery that the famous "Hitler's skull" in Moscow is female, as well as newly uncovered documents, provide powerful proof for their case. Dunstan and Williams cite people, places, and dates in over 500 detailed notes that identify the plan's escape route, vehicles, aircraft, U-boats, and hideouts. Among the details: the CIA's possible involvement and Hitler's life in Patagonia - including his two daughters.
©2011 Simon Dunstan, Gerrard Williams (P)2011 Gildan Media Corp
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By David R. Tolson on 17-09-2013

Too Long, but Worth Listening to Half

I've heard rumors for years that Adolf Hitler escaped to South America at the end of WWII. If it was true, Grey Wolf notwithstanding, then the rest of the world must have ignored it; the same thing that I should have done with part one of the book. The author gives much more detail than is necessary for most people regarding the alleged escape of Hitler from Europe during the waning days of the War. Anyone interested in this story, unless you're a Nazi or a historian, I would strongly urge that you skip part one and go directly to part two.
You will not miss anything important, since the story of Hitler's escape really does not start until part two. Part one basically talks about the fortunes of war turning for the Third Reich and how a few of Hitler's close aids started thinking about an escape. The irony here is that Hitler was maniacal about every soldier fighting until the bitter end, while he was looking for ways to escape the carnage he created as early as 1943.

For a subject that is at best, esoteric and at worst, a fabrication, the authors Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams does give it plausibility. That said, it is worth listening to, but cue the story at the second half mark.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Paragon on 21-04-2017

awesome book and what great listen

great summer time listen for any history buff. was hard to stop but had to at times.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

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4 out of 5 stars
By James on 02-04-2013

A curious tale

The book is well put together and the writer's have clearly researched their topic. The central theme remains probable and the insight from Hitler's later years is very interesting. The book does take some time to set the scene but overall it's an interesting and thought provoking story. On reflection, it took the American's years and years to hunt down Bin Laden and Sadam disappeared for some time before being caught. In an age before the digital era, world media, twitter and the internet it remains highly plausible that tin an age of typewriters and memos all was not what it seemed at the end of WW2.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars
By The Dr on 19-06-2018

A History lesson

The story does not start until chapter 15. It just goes into a history of world war 2 for 14 chapters.??????????
if I had wanted that I would not have bought this book, ah well, still interesting overall if ww2 is your bag.

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